Actor Andrew Ahrens on The Whipping Man

Andrew Ahrens, pictured here, reflects on his role in The Whipping Man, which begins performances on April 2 at Geva Theatre Center. Andrew plays Caleb, until recently a Confederate solider and the son of a former slave owner, who has just returned to his family's plantation in Richmond, VA. "As Caleb stumbles home to his father's mansion … Continue reading Actor Andrew Ahrens on The Whipping Man

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Actor Tyler Rollinson on The Whipping Man

Tyler J. Rollinson, pictured here, reflects on his role in The Whipping Man, which begins performances on April 2 at Geva Theatre Center. Tyler plays John, a former slave still living on the plantation in Richmond, VA. "No matter the time period: then, now, and in the future, we are defined by the choices we make. And John has … Continue reading Actor Tyler Rollinson on The Whipping Man

How this play crackles…

Director Tim Ocel, one of Geva's associate artists and director of the upcoming The Whipping Man, reflects on the importance of the play's story: The Whipping Man is a relatively new play; and good new plays, like this one, crackle with our current conversations. They discuss unresolved and necessary things. They are immediate and confrontational. They … Continue reading How this play crackles…

First peek at The Whipping Man

The Whipping Man, which opens on April 2 at Geva, begins on the very day that Robert E. Lee disbanded the Army of Northern Virginia, just four days after his surrender at Appomattox.  It takes place in Richmond, Virginia, a town destroyed by its own army. For much of the Civil War, Richmond had served as … Continue reading First peek at The Whipping Man

Thanks! Great blog yourself!

Drama Lit Blog 2.0: BU School of Theatre

I wanted to share this blog post from Geva Theatre (the company that premiered Pyretown) with everyone.

 

I am a huge advocate for finding ways to make the artistic process more transparent, accessible, and engaging for audiences. In fact I think one of my first blog posts for dramaturgy was about how much I love the idea of open rehearsals.  These goals allow lead to incredibly beneficial effects for an arts organization.

First, they give the audience a sense of ownership over the artistic product. A play is no longer just something they come to see, it has become something that they help make happen. Running a Kickstarter I am realizing how incredibly important it is to empower that sense of ownership. As artists how much do we want everyone we know to come see work we are proud of, to experience the the product of hours…

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