Playwright/Director Chay Yew’s World of Possibilities

In the first podcast episode of 2021, we’re thrilled to feature a conversation with playwright/director/producer, Chay Yew. We’ll all have an opportunity to see his work as a director this winter, with his direction of Brian Quijada’s Where Did We Sit on the Bus? And long-time Geva audiences may remember the production of Naomi Iizuka’s 36 Views, which Chay also directed. Pirronne Yousefzadeh joins Jenni Werner for this inspirational conversation that really focuses on the ways in which we can all open doors for others to follow us, and create opportunities for the next generation to grow and succeed.

Improvisation and Spilling a Few Secrets with Sound Designers Justin Ellington and David K Samba

In the fifth episode of Out of the Rehearsal Hall, Esther Winter, creative producer for Recognition Radio, and Jenni Werner talk with sound designers David K. Samba and Justin Ellington about jazz music, the nature of collaboration, sound design and composition as an out of body experience, what it means to “play with subs” and how we’re all sound designers at heart, even if we don’t know it yet.

Imagining a World Through Sound: Designers Christie Chiles Twillie and Larry Fowler

Jenni Werner and Esther Winter interview sound designers Larry Fowler and Christie Chiles Twillie about building worlds through sound and just how pivotal sound design is in COVID-era theatre experiences.

Playwrights Christina Anderson and Harrison David Rivers

Geva's literary director, Jenni Werner, and associate artistic director, Pirronne Yousefzadeh talk with playwrights Christina Anderson and Harrison David Rivers about listening to the voices in your head, finding inspiration in poetry, novels and raunchy rap lyrics, making space and time for imagination, and representation onstage. All in the third episode of Out of the Rehearsal Hall.

Uncovering Rochester’s Redlining History

In connection with Geva's Recognition Radio festival celebrating Black stories, we are producing a series of community conversations, called The Amplify Series, which connects themes of the plays to our lives here in the Rochester area. The first conversation examined the history of redlining and segregation in Rochester, the lasting impacts, and ways that we can effect change.